Student Green Screen Videos

To cap off the Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles fantasy novel study, my students filmed green screen videos that made it look like they were actually standing in Whangdoodleland! If you read the Whangdoodle book with students, there are many opportunities for super creative activities. In the book, characters travel by their imaginations to Whangdoodleland. In order to bridge between our world and the Whangdoodle’s world, the characters need scrappy caps (I talked about that fun craftivity HERE) and a willingness to believe.

By the end of the book, students wanted to actually be in Whangdoodleland, so we wrote stories about an imaginary animal who might live there and designed shoebox dioramas of a scene from the fictitious setting. Students had to include details from the book in their shoebox scenes. We took pictures of the finished scenes and inserted that into the green screen video background while students presented their stories about the imaginary animals. The final video made it look like the students were actually standing in Whangdoodleland talking about their animals.

Your students could create a similar video for a variety of novel units, history time periods, or science topics. Design the background based on your unit of study and then video tape the students presenting a story or information that suits the background. You could transport yourself back to an important event in history or put yourself inside a plant cell. When the students create the video, it is a lot like when meteorologists report about the weather and are pointing to things that are not actually there. The maps and graphics are inserted later on top of the green screen background.

Green Screen Shoebox Background Materials

  • 1 shoebox for each student (If you have shoeboxes with the attached lid, do not put any materials or decoration on the lid. Build inside the actual box only.)
  • Felt, various colors
  • Sequins
  • Beads
  • Cardstock or construction paper, various colors
  • Foam sheets or shapes, various colors
  • Play doh, model magic, clay in various colors
  • Feathers
  • Pom poms
  • Yarn, various colors
  • Popsicle sticks, clothespins…
  • Any other craft materials you may have
  • Elmer’s glue
  • Hot glue guns

Green Screen Video Procedure

  • Follow your writing workshop procedures and have students create the text they will be reading on video. For our project, students created an imaginary animal that could live in Whangdoodleland. When designing their animal, the students considered all aspects of the animal– habitat, eating habits, personality, etc. as well as including details from the book.

Whangdoodle planning page

  • After the writing is complete, design the shoebox scene. We needed about 3 class days to complete the scenes. Not only did students create the “habitat”, they designed a model of their creatures too that was placed in the box.

  • Take a close-up picture of each shoebox scene. You will want to take the photo in landscape orientation and zoom in close enough so the edges of your picture are the edges of the shoebox. The pictures that were the most successful in the videos used lots of brightly colored craft materials, and the students filled in the “floor” and back of the box to give more of a 3-D effect.

  • Videotape each student reading their story in front of the green screen. We had to look at the shoebox scene to determine where the student should stand, so they could add hand motions in the video and point to things that would appear in the shoebox background. Because my students were supposed to be in Whangdoodleland, the kids wore their scrappy caps while filming. Adding a little costume element is a fun detail!
  • Use a video editing app to create the final video. Our school’s technology teacher used iMovie for editing. There is an app called DoInk that would work too.
  • Upload all videos to a playlist on YouTube (unlisted) to share with families.

I was so excited about the final results of this video project. It definitely qualifies for differentiated instruction if you need to provide an activity that hits a wide variety of learning styles. And finally, I was pleasantly surprised by how many skills we covered– reading, writing, text evidence, summarizing, spatial reasoning, oral presentation, fine motor… To see the example of the video I modeled for the students, CLICK HERE. I even have a scrappy cap! To purchase my Whangdoodle novel unit, CLICK HERE.

Whangdoodle Scrappy Caps

I am in the middle of reading The Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles with my 4th graders, and they just finished designing their own Whangdoodle scrappy caps this week. It was a surprisingly successful craftivity and brought me unexpected teacher joy all week. The Whangdoodle book is written by Julie Edwards (you may know her as Julie Andrews… or the original Mary Poppins) and was published in the 1970s. It is one of my favorite fantasy books for upper elementary. Three siblings travel by imagination to Whangdoodleland with an eccentric professor. In order to travel from our world to the Whangdoodle’s world, they must wear brightly colored scrappy caps. The caps are like ruby slippers or the wardrobe to Narnia; they are the bridge to the magical land.

Whangdoodle scrappy cap

I wanted my students to have their own scrappy cap to wear during our novel study to focus our thinking about the book and activate our imaginations. I ordered knit beany caps for all and provided lots of fun accessories. I had a few reservations about the activity. I was not sure if the students would be that interested in stitching designs on the hats, or if they would buy into wearing the hats during our reading time. Boy, was I wrong.

Whangdoodle Scrappy Caps

The students spent a solid two days embroidering, gluing, and attaching various embellishments to their hats– boys and girls. They planned their designs carefully and figured out ways to stitch letters and patterns. I met with small groups and taught blanket stitch, chain, and a backstitch, and they started teaching each other and sharing ideas. A few knew how to make pom poms from yarn and started explaining the process to interested classmates. They figured out ways to mix felt with yarn, buttons, and sequins to add different effects to the hats. The results, both skills wise and with the hats’ appearance, have been well worth the class time dedicated to the project.

Scrappy Cap Materials

  • knit hats, buy in bulk, solid colors
  • yarn, bright colors
  • plastic needles, one per student
  • fabric glue
  • hot glue gun
  • sequins
  • buttons
  • felt, bright colors
  • feathers, bright colors
  • foam shapes
  • any other fun, decorative materials

Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles scrappy caps

I made a sample hat that I wear during class too. I shared the different techniques I used on the hat before letting the students loose to work on their own. All the materials were at a station, and students worked at their own pace. I set up the hot glue guns (I had two) at a station on the floor. If you don’t have low temp hot glue guns, include work gloves at the station. Small cloth gardening gloves work well to protect fingers from burning.

It helps to have some group instruction for basic sewing how-tos. I recommend students start with a piece of yarn that is about an arm’s length. They would put a simple slip knot at the end of the piece of yarn and thread the other end through the needle creating a fairly long “tail”. If they don’t have enough of the tail part pulled through the needle, they are constantly de-threading their yarn. Some of my students liked to tie the thread to the needle, but it created problems for them if they wanted to pull a stitch out. For right-handed students, they should hold the hat with their left hand, and use their right hand for the needle work (the opposite for a lefty). After observing students hold the hats, I realized how many benefits the activity has for OT type issues. Many were worried about really gripping onto the hat, and when they didn’t, the fabric was too wobbly to get the needle to pull through. The gripping hand works as a guide and stabilizer for the needle work. All students started with a basic running stitch.

Whangdoodle scrappy cap stitching

For the handful of students that wanted to get fancier, I pulled small groups and showed them a few specialty stitches. This helped students think spatially about moving left to right or right to left. Keeping one hand inside the hat in order to poke in and out of the center of the hat and not wrapping around the outside was little bit of a brain teaser for the kids. They also needed to plan ahead a few steps to create the design they wanted.

Whangdoodles scrappy cap

If you can work in the time for a sewing activity in your class, it will be worth it. The students activated a whole slew of skills that I did not expect, and they are so proud of their finished hats. They have been really excited to wear them, and we put them on not only for reading time, but during tests, to complete a writing activity, or just because it’s fun to have them on and makes us happy.

To see my full Last of the Really Great Whangdoodles novel unit, CLICK HERE. There are many posts with tutorials or YouTube videos for embroidery stitches. I found this BLOG POST with a few simple examples. I also had a “sewing for kids” book that I brought to the classroom, and students could flip through it.

Pinterest Page Writing Activity

A Pinterest page writing activity can be a great way for students to summarize and share key information on a topic you have been studying in class. My students recently designed a Pinterest page to show what they learned about Native Americans in the Southwest, but I have also used this writing activity with novel studies. My students were able to double up on some technology skills too, but the activity could be used with a printable template and handwritten if you don’t have access to computers.

Pinterest Writing Activity for social studies or novel studies

A Social Studies Pinterest Page

  • I started the activity by giving my students THIS PLANNING PAGE in order to brainstorm. They chose the Southwest group on which they wanted to focus, selected four sub-topics based on our class readings and notes, and jotted their notes down on the planning page.
  • Students needed a general description of the Native people that included the region and climate where the people lived. This is the equivalent to the profile information in a real Pinterest account.
  • Next, students sketched a simple drawing of the item that would be the image for the pin and a brief description (about three sentences) for the image on the planning page. Each pin represented a specific aspect or attribute of the Native American group. For example, my students who were creating a Navajo Pinterest board might have pins for weaving, a hogan home, turquoise jewelry, or sheep because these were some of the key details we read about in our textbook and supplemental readings.
  • Since we were also reviewing how to identify topic, main idea, and details, many students recognized how this project broke their information into topic (the name of the board), main idea (each pin topic), and details (the description with the pin).
  • THIS PINTEREST TEMPLATE could be used for any social studies topic. Students open the PowerPoint document and click in the text boxes to add their text using the ideas from their planning/brainstorm page. They can delete the blank rectangle image place holders and insert their own images or leave the rectangles, print, and hand draw pictures. If you want students to handwrite the entire activity, use THIS PRINTABLE TEMPLATE.

Pinterest Writing Activity for social studies or novel studies

A Book Character Pinterest Page

  • The character Pinterest page is a unique writing activity for students to share what they know about a favorite book character. It requires students to identify key character traits and design a board that represents the book character. I tried this activity for the first time last year, and it was a good challenge for the students to explain why a character would choose to “pin” a certain item. The thinking process involved in designing the character Pinterest page was more involved than it appears at first glance.
  • I give the students THE PLANNING PAGE. They choose a key character from a book and think about specific traits for that character. The trick is to identify traits that define the character and translate that into a pin image with a description that shows understanding of a character. For example, Charlotte in Charlotte’s Web might pin the latest edition of a thesaurus because she needs word ideas to help Wilbur. We created Pinterest boards for the main characters in a graphic novel called Dying to Meet You by Kate Klise. Next to the profile picture, students wrote a general description of the character and then dug deeper into the character with the pin choices and descriptions.
  • THIS CHARACTER PINTEREST TEMPLATE could be used for any novel or story. If you want students to handwrite the entire activity, use THE PRINTABLE TEMPLATE.

Pinterest Writing Activity for social studies or novel studiesFor even more fun writing activities you can use in your classroom, CLICK HERE.

Using Post-it Big Notes with Students

I have several weaknesses, and cool office supplies is definitely one of them (mini sized things and cupcakes are close behind). Recently, several sizes of Post-it Big Notes caught my eye as I wandered up and down the Staples aisles. How could I resist? Post-it notes are a teacher’s best friend, and there are so many uses for them. With a regular sized Post-it note, my favorite activity is to print rubrics with them LIKE THIS. But, the giant Post-it notes opened up a whole new catalog of classroom activity ideas.

using post-it big notes with students in the classroom

I decided I needed an activity tout de suite for the giant sized sticky papers. I emailed the 8th grade teachers to see if we could plan a group activity to review summer reading the first week back at school. I wanted the students to compare aspects of a hero. Both grades read books over the summer that dealt with heroes and mixing the two groups helped encourage more discussion about the topic.

using post-it big notes with students in the classroom

We asked the students to create a thinking web. The students wrote the word hero in the middle of the sticky note. Students added words that describe a hero to the first layer of the web. Attached to the vocabulary words, students added details from their summer reading books that supported the descriptive words. Finally, the students made a generalization about heroes. The older students read Unbroken by Hillebrand and my students read Poppy by Avi. Even though the books are vastly different, there was quite a bit of common ground. The finished webs helped the 8th graders develop an essay about what makes a person a hero. The 4th graders used the webs to trace Poppy’s hero’s journey.

using post-it big notes with students in the classroom

Since we could move the Post-it notes and stick them to the board, walls, or other areas around the room, the students could easily compare ideas with other students. I could have students working in different locations whether they were standing up or sitting down, and we could move and group the giant notes based on our different discussions.

Other Ways to Use Post-it Notes with Students

  • Have students write their favorite detail from a story and then move them into the order that follows the story plot.
  • At the end of a unit, have one giant Post-it note for a specific sub-topic or concept within the unit. Students add notes about the topic. Each Post-it note becomes ideas for a paragraph in a writing assignment or summary of the pieces of a unit to build a final overview of the unit.
  • Write the title of the novel you are using as a read aloud, in reading groups, or in book clubs at the top of the Post-it note. As students find favorite quotes, copy the quote on the big paper. Or, copy quotes onto regular sized Post-it notes and attach to the big Post-it. Quotes can be moved or grouped to reveal character information, themes, conflicts, etc.
  • Write a book genre name at the top of the Post-it. As students complete books, they add a title that matches the genre to the appropriate big Post-it. The book lists become a book recommendation wall. In place of writing the title, you could print a small image of the book cover and attach the picture to the giant Post-it.
  • Practice perspective and point of view by pasting an image that includes a group of people in the middle of the big note and assign a group of students to each Post-it. Students practice point of view by making a comment from the point of view of people in the picture using first person, third person, third person limited, etc.
  • Write a spelling rule, pattern, root word, or any specific vocabulary “family” at the top of the paper. Add examples as you find them and keep the Post-it in view, so student can see the growing list. This would work well in science and social studies classes too.
  • Design a timeline for history topics. Label a Post-it for a time period and add notes, images, ideas to the Post-it. As you study new periods, stick the Post-its side-by-side in time order. It is a great visual to see progression in technology, culture, industry, movement of people and goods, and other themes.
  • Write a topic or concept that you are studying in class at the top of the Post-it. Any time students find examples in their daily life, they write the example on the big note. If you are reviewing comparative adjectives, students can write words they use during the day that are this type of adjective (faster, slower, sharper, colder…). This idea would also work well in a math class, so students could see a variety of examples of a new concept.
  • Any type of anchor chart! The fact that the Post-it paper sticks to most surfaces and can be moved and re-stuck is great for teacher anchor charts. You can have the information in a prominent area and then move it to a side location in your classroom where it can still be viewed but is not taking up prime real estate.

using post-it big notes with students in the classroomThere is one drawback to the big Post-it notes– the price. They are a little more expensive than chart paper, so I am saving them for special activities. To read about more classroom activity ideas, CLICK HERE and HERE.

 

State Regions Mini Book

My fourth grade students start the year studying geography and create a state regions mini book in our history class. We review landform definitions first; then we practice map skills. As a culminating activity, students identify the main regions in the United States and design the mini book. The mini book includes a small U.S. map and brief facts about the region. As a group, we try to look for generalizations about United States’ climate, geography, resources, and industry. These facts form a strong foundation to help us later in the school year when we study Native Americans and talk about how cultures developed and adapted to their environment in order to live.

state region foldable mini book

Before students make the mini book, they research general information about a region in the United States. I follow our school history book when identifying the regions and the states that are included in each region. Our textbook names 5 U.S. regions– southeast, northeast, southwest, midwest, west, but I have certainly seen different options for grouping states. The students complete these U.S Regions Project Notes and then are ready to build their booklet.

How do you Make a Mini Book?

  • Gather your materials
    • 4×6 notecards
    • scissors
    • rubberband (medium sized)
  • Fold 2+ notecards in half the “hamburger” way making sure the corners line up neatly. That means the 6″ side would be folded. Press down firmly along the fold.

spelling mini books folded

  • Once each card is folded, stack the cards, so they are nesting one inside another and line them up evenly. The region mini books use 2 cards, but I think 3-4 cards is is a nice amount if you are making this booklet for a different project.
  • Following the center fold, cut a 1/2″ notch from the top and bottom edge of the stack of cards.

mini books cut knotch

  • Wrap a rubberband around the stack of cards. Have the rubberband sit down into the cut sections of paper to act as the mini book binding. If the rubberband is too tight and pulling on the paper, cut your notches a little deeper.

mini books rubberband

  • Decorate the cover and add notes, drawings, information… to each page of the booklet. For the states regions booklets, students cut out a small U.S. map and color the states that are in the region they researched. That map is pasted in the center pages. On the cover, the student names the region and adds his/her name. The blank pages before and after the center U.S. map page are for the general region information. The students can add the information and illustrations in any order they would like.

These mini books are great for many projects. CLICK HERE to see other ideas for using this craftivity with students. To view and purchase some of my map skills and geography resources for upper elementary students, CLICK HERE.